Links for 6-8-2018

Links for 5-1-2018

Links for 4-27-2018

  • The first meeting between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un was long on photo ops and handshakes, but short on details regarding how North Korea will give up its nuclear weapons. Stories have been circulating to the effect that North Korea’s nuclear test site is unusable, damaged beyond repair after the country’s last test. American intelligence agencies believe the test site is still usable, and North Korea’s announced closure of the site could be quickly reversed.

  • David Catron explains why Alfie Evans will never escape Britain’s National Health Service alive:

    Though his [Tom Evans’] case was simple — set my son free to seek treatment elsewhere — and though he was granted hearing after hearing with “red judges” like Mr. Justice Hayden and legal luminaries like Sir Andrew McFarlane, the answer was always the same. Acquiescence in the pleas of Alfie’s parents wouldn’t have cost the NHS or the British taxpayer a farthing, yet Alfie’s doctors and the hospital didn’t even consider releasing him. Even when the Pope interceded and transportation was provided to move him to an Italian hospital that was ready to admit him, it somehow continued to be in “Alfie’s interest” to remain hostage to the NHS.

    If you don’t understand why the NHS and British courts refused, you don’t get socialized medicine. It is not, nor has it ever been, about health care. It’s about power. Once a government — any government — takes control of your health care, they own you and your children. Alfie’s parents and the British public had for months demanded Alfie’s release just to seek treatment by doctors competent enough to figure out what was wrong with him. But, for a socialized system, that’s dangerous.

    Later:

    By yesterday afternoon, they had Tom Evans dutifully tugging his forelock, and he was given multiple pats on the head by the British Ministry of Truth as well as the government organs on our side of the pond, all of which commended him for “working with the doctors.” British Member of European Parliament Steven Woolfe will introduce “Alfie’s Law,” which will certainly help his career. And where is Alfie himself? He is exactly where he was when all this started, in the iron grip of the NHS, a third-world socialized medical system from which no force can get him released — except of course for the grim reaper.

  • The Italian priest who has been at Alfie Evans’ bedside was booted out of the hospital because he kept reminding the staff that God is watching them and judging their sins against Alfie’s life.

  • Bethany Mandel writes that Alfie Evans is the reason Americans have the Second Amendment.

  • The House Intelligence Committee released its report on Russian involvement in the 2016 presidential election, and it contains a curious detail: it was former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper who told CNN that James Comey briefed Donald Trump on the Steele dossier, which sparked the Russian collusion narrative in the media. When Congress questioned him about this in July 2017, Clapper denied talking to the media about the Comey briefing; Clapper has since changed his tune. Clapper is also the person who instructed Comey to brief Trump on the dossier, which makes the whole thing look like a setup. To top it off, Clapper is now a CNN contributor.

  • A federal district court judge tossed Paul Manafort’s lawsuit challenging Robert Mueller’s authority.

  • Congressman Patrick Meehan (R-PA) resigned and said he would repay the U.S. Treasury the money he used to settle a former staffer’s sexual harassment claim.

  • The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals finally approved Texas’ photo voter ID law. The state’s original photo voter ID law was quickly challenged, and the legislature modified it in 2017 to address the Fifth Circuit’s complaints.

  • Israeli troops shot and killed three protesters along the border fence with the Gaza Strip.

Links for 4-12-2018

Links for 4-6-2018

Links for 3-31-2018

Links for 3-29-2018

  • Russia booted 60 American diplomats out of the country and ordered the closure of the consulate in St. Petersburg.

  • Another collection of text messages exchanged between FBI Agent Peter Strzok and FBI lawyer Lisa Page appeared, and these suggest coordination between Barack Obama’s Chief of Staff Denis McDonough, Senator Harry Reid, and and CIA Director John Brennan during the early days of the investigation into collusion between Donald Trump’s campaign and the Russians.

  • Stanley Kurtz wrote a short history of First Amendment problems at Clemson University:

    Clemson’s liberals and conservative are at daggers drawn, not so much debating national policy as struggling over the ability of one side to control the expression of the other. However Clemson chooses to address issues like historical memorials and faculty diversity hires, those decisions ought to be the outcome of open discussion and debate, not the punishment or suppression of speech.

    Far from undermining civility, free speech inculcates the practice of respectful self-restraint in the face of disagreement. Restoration of free speech at Clemson is the best hope for staunching the hair-trigger sensitivities and trolling now embittering its dueling political factions.

  • A survey of the people who participated in the “March for Our Lives” protest in Washington, D.C. indicates the attendees were not the people the media portrayed them to be — in particular, only about 10% were under 18 years old.

  • The Public Interest Legal Foundation sued the Office of the Harris County Voter Registrar for refusing to open its voter rolls to inspection. Harris County has admitted to problems with non-citizens registered to vote, but won’t allow its voter rolls to be inspected to see how big that problem is.

  • Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy will stand trial on influence peddling charges:

    The case came about after investigators used phone-taps to examine separate allegations that late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi funded Sarkozy’s campaign. The investigators began to suspect the former president had kept tabs on a separate case through a network of informants.

    Later:

    Based on the intercepts, Sarkozy, who still had political influence at the time despite having left office, is accused of having discussed offering a promotion to a prosecutor in return for tip-offs on another campaign funding probe.

  • Nissan and Renault are reportedly discussing a merger, which would resolve the strange relationship the two companies already have — Renault owns a 43% interest in Nissan, Nissan owns a 15% interest in Renault, and the two companies share a chairman, Carlos Ghosn.