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  • Philip Klein thinks the Republican party’s failure to repeal ObamaCare is the biggest broken political promise ever:

    Republicans were always moving the goal posts on voters. That is, during campaign season, they made boasts about repeal, and then once in office, they talked about procedural complications. In 2010, they campaigned on repeal, but by 2011, they said they needed the Senate. In 2014, they won the Senate, but by 2015 they said as long as Obama was in office, nothing would become law. In 2016, they told conservative voters, even reluctant ones, that if they voted for Trump despite any reservations, they’d finally be able to repeal Obamacare. In November, voters gave them unified control of Washington. And yet after just two months on the job, they have thrown in the towel and said they’re willing to abandon seven years of promises.

    Later:

    In this case, the hardliners were playing a productive role by pointing out the real policy consequences of the piecemeal approach being pursued by the House leadership. Though we’ll never know for sure how the numbers might of looked if a vote had taken place, it’s clear that many centrist members of the Republican caucus were also prepared to vote this bill down. House conservatives, if they could be blamed for anything, it’s for having the audacity to urge leadership to actually honor seven years of pledges to voters to repeal Obamacare. If anybody was moving the goal posts, it wasn’t Freedom Caucusers, it was those who were trying to sell a bill that kept much of Obamacare’s regulatory architecture in place as a free market repeal and replace plan.

    Later:

    What’s so utterly disgraceful, is not just that Republicans failed so miserably, but that they barely tried, raising questions about whether they ever actually wanted to repeal Obamacare in the first place.

  • Jeffrey Tucker writes on what must replace ObamaCare if it’s actually going to help people:

    The first priority is that competition must be restored through some measure of deregulation. The mandates must go. The pre-set benefits packages must die. Insurers must gain control over their business affairs and customers have to be able to shop and choose.

    It is not about ideology. It is about a system of health care insurance that actually works to serve the common good. We must regain flexibility to inspire innovation and achieve profitability. This must happen or else premiums will keep going up. This is a requirement. Obamacare failed because it disabled the market. Any reform must restore that market. This is more important than any other feature of reform.

    Trumpcare or Ryancare or whatever you want to call it does not do that. It replaces a mandate to buy with a tax incentive to buy. Otherwise it leaves the problem of the absence of genuine competition in place. True, the alternative doesn’t do anything about the transfer of payments, but, if you follow Hayek, you know that these are less important to eliminate than are the barriers to competition.

  • The night before his revelation about intelligence gathering that targeted Donald Trump’s transition team, Congressman Devin Nunes received a communication on his phone while he was in an Uber with a committee staffer. Nunes abruptly exited the car and disappeared for the evening. Is there a whistleblower behind Nunes’ revelation?

  • An American immigration judge granted asylum to a Singaporean blogger named Amos Yee. Singapore had jailed Yee twice. The Department of Homeland Security opposed Yee’s asylum request.

  • The U.S. military is investigating a close air support strike in Mosul that allegedly killed dozens of civilians.

  • Four Egyptian soldiers died when their vehicle hit an IED in the Sinai Peninsula.

  • UKIP’s only member of parliament, Douglas Carswell, is leaving the party to stand as an independent. Nigel Farage has called for Carswell to quit, and a UKIP donor named Arron Banks intends to run against Carswell.

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