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  • Victor Davis Hanson explains how President Obama’s foreign policy differs from ancient foreign policy that actually works, even today:

    In contrast, when a national leader repeatedly lectures the world on peace, takes options off the table, uses the megaphone to blast his own country’s flaws and distance himself from its supposedly checkered past, heralds soft power, and in psychodramatic fashion issues rhetorical red lines, deadlines, and step-over lines, then he erodes deterrence (in becoming predictably passive). And the while, his empty sanctimoniousness grates rivals and invites gratuitous adventurism. The gunslingers of the world vie to gain a reputation by showing other outlaws how enervated the once-robust sheriff has become, despite his trash-talking — and sometimes they stage a shoot-out on Main Street for no apparent reason other than that they can.

  • A judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit revived lawsuits filed by Judicial Watch and Cause of Action over how the State Department and the National Archives handled Hillary Clinton’s emails.

  • An engineer who worked for Hamas and Hezbollah, Mohammed al-Zawari, was gunned down in Tunisia. Al-Zawari was an expert on drones, and was reportedly working on underwater drones that could be used to attack Israel’s offshore natural gas platforms.

  • Adriel Kasonta writes that it’s time for the EU to get tough on Turkey:

    According to Hans-Christian Ströbel, a Green-party member of the German Bundestag, Turkey’s intelligence agency MIT has around 6,000 informants in Germany alone. These informants reportedly pass the names of dissidents to the MIT, which adds them to the government’s blacklist of people it wishes to arrest in the future. Intelligence expert and author Erich Schmidt-Eenboom explained in an interview with The Local that each informant could be responsible for monitoring 500 people with Turkish roots in Germany, which is a home to around 3 million Turks. This would also mean that these spies are each monitoring more people than the Stasi did in West Germany during the Cold War.

    The main difference between the MIT and the Stasi, according to Schmidt-Eenboom, is that the later engaged primarily in gathering military, political, and economic intelligence in West Germany, rather than targeting former citizens. “This is no longer about intelligence reconnaissance, but rather this is increasingly being used for intelligence repression,” he warned.

  • Gunmen broke into the home of a prominent Iraqi female freelance journalist, Afrah Shawqi al-Qaisi, and kidnapped her.

  • An Argentine judge indicted former President Cristina Fernandez, accusing her of participating in a corruption scheme that stole money from public road projects.

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