Links for 4-22-2017

Links for 4-16-2017

  • North Korea launched another ballistic missile as Vice President Mike Pence was flying to South Korea. The missile exploded almost immediately.

  • Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan claimed victory in a referendum to approve constitutional amendments that would change Turkey from a parliamentary government (led by a prime minister) to an executive government (led by a president — Erdogan). Turks who live in the U.S. voted overwhelmingly against the constitutional amendments. Erdogan immediately warned his opponents not to challenge the result; they’d likely end up in prison with the tens of thousands of people who were arrested after last year’s attempted military coup.

  • Someone staged a truck bomb attack against buses that were evacuating people from government-held towns in Syria, killing 126 people, including 68 children.

  • There was another riot near the University of California at Berkeley campus when pro-Trump demonstrators were attacked by counter-protesters. Twenty-one people were arrested.

  • Sharyl Attkisson assembled a timeline of Obama administration surveillance of whistleblowers, journalists, and people with connections to Russia.

  • An anonymous professor at an American university details the de-professionalization of the academy:

    In the fall of 2005, I began working as a full-time faculty member in the General Studies program at Hudson University. I was promoted to full Professor last year. Thus, the tale I tell does not represent sour grapes. Rather, what follows is a jeremiad decrying the direction that academia has taken in order to underscore the threats posed to academic integrity and institutional legitimacy. Over twelve years, I have watched with increasing dismay and incredulity as academic integrity, fairness, and intellectual rigor have eroded, with the implicit endorsement of administration and faculty alike. I have witnessed the de-professionalization of the professoriate—hiring policies based on tokenized identity politics and cronyism, the increasing intellectual and ideological conformity expected from faculty and students, and the subsequent curtailment of academic freedom.

    Later this professor chaired a committee to hire a writing professor:

    In the Skype interview following this discussion, a fellow committee member proceeded to attack the next job candidate, a candidate whom I respected. In fact, before the interview, this colleague, obviously enraged by my criticisms of her favorite, announced that she would ruthlessly attack the next candidate. She did exactly that, asking increasingly obtuse questions, while adopting a belligerent tone and aggressive posture from the start. That candidate, incidentally, had done fascinating scholarship on the history of U.S. journalism from the late 19th through the first half of the 20th Century. He had earned his Ph.D. from a top-ten English department, had since accrued considerable teaching experience in relevant subjects, and presented a record of noteworthy publications, including academic scholarship and journalism. He interviewed extremely well, except when he was harangued and badgered by the hostile interviewer. He should have been a finalist for the job. But he had a fatal flaw: he was a white, straight male.

  • Der Spiegel reported that the Tunisian man who drove a truck into a Christmas market in Berlin received his orders directly from ISIS.

  • Brazilian engineering company Odebrecht paid $3.3 billion in bribes between 2005 and 2014. This was discovered as a result of the investigation into the Operation Car Wash scandal.

Links for 4-3-2017

Links for 4-2-2017

Links for 3-29-2017

  • California Attorney General Xavier Becerra filed 15 felony charges against David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt of the Center for Medical Progress for secretly recording Planned Parenthood officials discussing the sale of baby body parts. The charges related to recording someone without their consent. Becerra has received at least $5,535 in campaign contributions from Planned Parenthood. The Center for Medical Progress responded with a new video showing a Planned Parenthood official describing what they do (or don’t do) when a baby is born alive during an abortion:

  • U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May officially kicked off the Brexit process by sending a letter to the E.U. that invokes Article 50.

  • Defense Secretary Jim Mattis asked Donald Trump to relax restrictions on U.S. involvement in the fighting in Yemen:

    This official and several others said that Mattis and his advisers have asked for removal of President Barack Obama’s prohibitions, which would enable the military to support Emirati operations against the Houthis with surveillance and intelligence, refueling, and operational planning assistance without asking for case-by-case White House approval.

  • The FBI charged a State Department employee with a top secret security clearance, Candace Marie Claiborne, with concealing a years-long relationship with two Chinese intelligence agents. The FBI says Claiborne started accepting cash and gifts from the agents in 2010.

  • Ben Shapiro thinks many conservatives who support Donald Trump are suffering from Stockholm syndrome:

    It now appears that the cognitive dissonance associated with Trump support has morphed into full-blown Stockholm syndrome, with conservatives now waiving principle not to defeat Hillary Clinton, but to back Trump down the line. Many conservatives now say that Trump’s American Health Care Act was the best available bad option. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and President Trump had presented a crap sandwich, to be sure, but it was the best available crap sandwich. Never mind its 17 percent public-approval rating. Never mind its accelerated death spiral. Never mind its new entitlement, its maintenance of key Obamacare regulations, or its increased premiums for the next few years.

    Trump wanted it; thus it was good; thus it had to be passed. It was The Best We Were Going To Do™.

    Except that it wasn’t. It wasn’t the legislative process that required a bill cramdown on the president’s own party within a three-week period. It wasn’t the legislative process that offered an ultimatum to conservatives to embrace the suck. It wasn’t the legislative process that demanded conservatives sign on to all the policies they opposed when Obama promulgated them. It was Trump. And because Ryan thought that his best option involved parlaying with Trump rather than going through the rough business of policymaking, he negotiated with himself to create a one-off bill, hoping that Trump would bring the anti-establishment conservatives and that he’d bring the establishment Republicans.

    It failed, in part because of Trump’s artificial deadline, in part because Trump would never have pushed a truly conservative piece of legislation that did away with preexisting-conditions regulations, and in part because Ryan decided to go along with Trump’s program in order to push through his long-awaited structural changes to Medicaid. And then, to top it off, Trump deployed famed subtle touch Steve Bannon to scream at Republicans about how they had to get their minds right or they’d spend the night in the box.

  • Westinghouse Electric filed for bankruptcy due to losses stemming from nuclear power plant construction projects.

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s governing coalition wants to change parliamentary rules so a member of the Alternative for Germany (AfD) party can’t assume a ceremonial post if AfD wins seats in the next election.

Links for 3-18-2017

Links for 3-15-2017