Links for 1-5-2018

Links for 7-31-2017

  • Psycho troll Anthony Scaramucci was fired as White House communications director.

  • Over the weekend Donald Trump threatened to end Congress’ illegal exemption from ObamaCare; this is actually a good idea, if only for the rule of law aspect. He should also end the unconstitutional “cost-sharing reduction payments” that subsidize insurance companies.

  • Congressional IT contractor Imran Awan was “frantically liquidating multiple real estate properties” the day he tried to leave the U.S. for Pakistan and was arrested by the FBI.

  • Democrats on the House Ethics Committee are stretching out the investigation of Congressman Devin Nunes’ alleged disclosure of classified information to keep Nunes out of the House Intelligence Committee’s Russia investigation.

  • Paul Vitz and Bruce Buff write that adolescents need to recover religion:

    In America, the transcendent dimension of life has historically been expressed primarily through the Judeo-Christian tradition, whose decline in recent years has created an enormous vacuum in meaning. This vacuum has been “filled” by postmodern nihilism combined with the “deconstruction” — aggressively taught in the academy — of belief in objective truth, goodness, and beauty. Moral relativism now eclipses transcendent meaning. The fragility of many young people — often termed “snowflakes” — shows their emotional vulnerability. They interpret ideas that challenge them as unbearable acts of aggression, and they use harsh and even violent measures to silence disagreeable opponents. In short, the prevalence of political correctness is a clear sign that belief in higher meaning and rational discussion has ceased to function in much of our higher-education system. Furthermore, political correctness is itself a symptom of the unstable mental condition of those who insist on it.

    Countless young people now live in a world without any real meaning; they feel there is nothing for them to believe in. Emotional numbness is one of the consequences. They no longer value themselves for their inherent worth and dignity as created by God; they no longer find self-worth in their efforts to lead lives based on truth and love. Instead, many of our young people look outside themselves for validation — to material goods and social feedback. But many find these superficial, transitory, and empty. In addition, the decline of religion has resulted in sexual relations becoming trivialized and deprived of any greater meaning. The “hook-up” culture leaves many wounded young people in its wake.

  • For some reason Los Angeles is happy about the prospect of losing billions by hosting the 2028 Summer Olympics.

  • Theresa May and her government are bungling Brexit:

    The rosy-eyed version of Brexit — in which Britain negotiates an amicable deal with its European counterparts and through the magic of bilateral free-trade deals weathers the exit with little economic damage, all while reclaiming control over immigration and parliamentary sovereignty — is no longer on the table, and perhaps it never truly was in the first place. There are thus two realistic scenarios for Britain’s eventual exit from the EU.

    The first is cataclysmic. This is the “no deal” option, in which Britain and the EU fail to arrive at an agreement by March 2019 and Britain simply crashes out of the union with no parachute in place. Britain’s trade with the EU would revert to World Trade Organization rules; a hard border would return to Ireland; goods would pile up at Dover and Calais and chaos would reign as confused agents apply customs checks and tariffs to which they are thoroughly unaccustomed; perhaps even flights between the U.K. and EU operated by British airlines would be unable to run. That scenario is bad enough that — surely — avoiding it would inspire sufficient action to negotiate some sort of deal, even a relatively punitive one.

  • There’s evidence that North Korean submarines may be preparing another missile launch.

  • ISIS claimed responsibility for an attack on Iraq’s embassy in Kabul.

  • Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro claimed victory in an election for a “constituent assembly” that will re-write the constitution; this outcome was preordained. In response the U.S. imposed new sanctions on Maduro.

Links for 4-6-2017

Links for 3-30-2017

Links for 3-27-2017

Links for 3-25-2017

  • Philip Klein thinks the Republican party’s failure to repeal ObamaCare is the biggest broken political promise ever:

    Republicans were always moving the goal posts on voters. That is, during campaign season, they made boasts about repeal, and then once in office, they talked about procedural complications. In 2010, they campaigned on repeal, but by 2011, they said they needed the Senate. In 2014, they won the Senate, but by 2015 they said as long as Obama was in office, nothing would become law. In 2016, they told conservative voters, even reluctant ones, that if they voted for Trump despite any reservations, they’d finally be able to repeal Obamacare. In November, voters gave them unified control of Washington. And yet after just two months on the job, they have thrown in the towel and said they’re willing to abandon seven years of promises.

    Later:

    In this case, the hardliners were playing a productive role by pointing out the real policy consequences of the piecemeal approach being pursued by the House leadership. Though we’ll never know for sure how the numbers might of looked if a vote had taken place, it’s clear that many centrist members of the Republican caucus were also prepared to vote this bill down. House conservatives, if they could be blamed for anything, it’s for having the audacity to urge leadership to actually honor seven years of pledges to voters to repeal Obamacare. If anybody was moving the goal posts, it wasn’t Freedom Caucusers, it was those who were trying to sell a bill that kept much of Obamacare’s regulatory architecture in place as a free market repeal and replace plan.

    Later:

    What’s so utterly disgraceful, is not just that Republicans failed so miserably, but that they barely tried, raising questions about whether they ever actually wanted to repeal Obamacare in the first place.

  • Jeffrey Tucker writes on what must replace ObamaCare if it’s actually going to help people:

    The first priority is that competition must be restored through some measure of deregulation. The mandates must go. The pre-set benefits packages must die. Insurers must gain control over their business affairs and customers have to be able to shop and choose.

    It is not about ideology. It is about a system of health care insurance that actually works to serve the common good. We must regain flexibility to inspire innovation and achieve profitability. This must happen or else premiums will keep going up. This is a requirement. Obamacare failed because it disabled the market. Any reform must restore that market. This is more important than any other feature of reform.

    Trumpcare or Ryancare or whatever you want to call it does not do that. It replaces a mandate to buy with a tax incentive to buy. Otherwise it leaves the problem of the absence of genuine competition in place. True, the alternative doesn’t do anything about the transfer of payments, but, if you follow Hayek, you know that these are less important to eliminate than are the barriers to competition.

  • The night before his revelation about intelligence gathering that targeted Donald Trump’s transition team, Congressman Devin Nunes received a communication on his phone while he was in an Uber with a committee staffer. Nunes abruptly exited the car and disappeared for the evening. Is there a whistleblower behind Nunes’ revelation?

  • An American immigration judge granted asylum to a Singaporean blogger named Amos Yee. Singapore had jailed Yee twice. The Department of Homeland Security opposed Yee’s asylum request.

  • The U.S. military is investigating a close air support strike in Mosul that allegedly killed dozens of civilians.

  • Four Egyptian soldiers died when their vehicle hit an IED in the Sinai Peninsula.

  • UKIP’s only member of parliament, Douglas Carswell, is leaving the party to stand as an independent. Nigel Farage has called for Carswell to quit, and a UKIP donor named Arron Banks intends to run against Carswell.