Links for 1-14-2017

  • Congressman Justin Amash explained this week’s budget resolution vote in a series of tweets:













  • Andrew McCarthy writes on the politicization of the Obama Justice Department:

    So, in a nutshell: A vague and apparently unsubstantiated suspicion of criminality connected to the Republican presidential candidate, based on potential involvement of Russia, prompts the Obama Justice Department to continue investigating under FISA and to approach the court twice — the latter time, very shortly before Election Day — for surveillance warrants.

    In stark contrast, concrete and substantiated suspicions of wrongdoing by the Democratic presidential candidate prompt a refusal by the Obama Justice Department to assist the FBI investigation (except to immunize the wrongdoers). Moreover, despite what the intelligence community maintains is confirmed evidence of Russian cyberespionage, the Obama Justice Department — far from seeking court warrants — refuses to compel production of Democratic communication devices.

    You’d almost think the Obama Justice Department makes enforcement decisions based on partisan politics.

  • The inspector general for the Department of Agriculture sifted through billions of food stamp transactions and found 3,394 stores that accept food stamps have owners who are dead, at least according to Social Security records. Normally we think of food stamp fraud as something committed by people who fraudulently obtain and spend food stamps, but the retailing side of the program isn’t policed well, either.

  • The corporate PACs of Microsoft, Facebook, Google, and Amazon collectively spent slightly more money on Republican Congressional candidates than they did on Democratic candidates in 2016. The PACs did not contribute to presidential campaigns. The contributions of these companies’ employees is still tilted strongly to Democrats.

  • The former head of Ukraine’s top intelligence agency, Valentyn Nalyvaichenko, is now campaigning to root out the country’s endemic corruption.